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The Mortgage Application Process

clock June 25, 2014 08:32 by author MyTitleDirect
Now that you have negotiated a sales price and reached an agreement with the seller of your home, it is time to apply for your mortgage. You can first reach out to the lender that gave you the mortgage pre-approval, or any other lender if you desire. Since you now have a contract of sale and are ready to apply, it is not a problem to check out which lender can give you the lowest rates and fees. Once you decide on the lender, you will need to gather up some more documents. The lender will need to get a copy of the contract of sale, as well as a canceled check you are using for your down payment. If you decide to pursue with a different lender than the one who pre-approved you, you will need to re-gather your income and tax information mentioned earlier and have your credit re-checked. This can also happen with your same lender if a large amount of time has passed since your pre-approval was issued. The lender will also need a copy of any applicants’ driver’s license/identification card as well as their social security card to verify identity. Once all the appropriate documents are gathered, your mortgage application (1003) will be prepared. Your loan officer will send all of your documents and information into processing where your application will be finalized and set for disclosure. Your loan officer will send you your mortgage application and disclosures to be looked over, signed and sent back. The mortgage application and disclosures include, but are not limited to: ·       Your personal information including name, social security number, address, and contact information ·       Your current employer ·       The type of mortgage you are applying for ·       The purchase price of your home with your anticipated down payment ·       Your quoted interest rate and mortgage payment (this may not necessarily be your locked in rate) including principal and interest, mortgage insurance if applicable, and your estimated taxes and insurance ·       A good faith estimate of your total costs of the loan; this would include the bank origination fees, title fees, mortgage insurance if applicable, application fees and more Please look over the application and disclosures carefully. There is a lot of information included, so it would be advised to understand what you are applying for as well as make sure the information is accurate. You should contact your loan officer with any questions or concerns you have. Once you send back your signed disclosures, this is usually a good time to lock in your interest rate. Rates change on a daily basis, which means the rate you are quoted today may be different than the rate you qualify for next week. You want to make sure you get the best possible rate. Consult your loan officer about current rates and make a decision on when the best time to lock in would be.


Preparing yourself for a home purchase

clock June 16, 2014 07:18 by author MyTitleDirect
Preparing yourself for a home purchase is very important. When you are investing in one of the biggest purchases of your life, you want to make sure you are ready. Here are things to consider that may help: Look over your Financial Situation A. Check your credit. Run your credit (if you haven’t in the last 3 months); you are entitled to a free credit report once a year. There are online sites such Credit Karma who do this for free, or you can even look into creating an account with one of the three big credit Bureaus (Experian, TransUnion, Equifax). Knowing your credit score will give you an idea if you are in good standing to buy a home. You will also be able to see if there are any issues on your report that you need to take care of. Certain issues can prevent you from buying a home at this time, and remember too, the better your credit score, the better rate you will qualify for. B. Gather information on all of the monthly income you generate by collecting documents such as W2’s, tax returns and recent pay stubs. Your lender will look at your gross monthly income as the source for qualifying you. Your gross pay is the amount you receive before any deductions (federal and state taxes, social security, etc.). If you are not receiving any income, it is probably not the best time to look into buying a home. C. Make a list of all your monthly payment obligations. This includes all credit card payments, student loans, car payments and any other loan balances (you will see these on your credit report). You do not necessarily need the utility bills at this time because your lender will not use them for qualification. D. Prepare a budget based on how much of a mortgage payment you believe you will be able to afford. This may not necessarily be the amount you will qualify for, but it a good first step in understanding based on your monthly expenses, what you feel confident in being able to pay. E. Have a game plan for your down payment. Find out how much money you plan on using for your home purchase and if you will be using money from your checking/savings accounts, a retirement account, money inherited or even gifted from a friend or family member.   Read the rest on buyhomeapp.com here


Home Inspection Report: The When and Why

clock April 9, 2014 10:27 by author MyTitleDirect
Once your offer has been accepted, but before you sign your Contract of Sale, it is very important to get your home Inspected by a qualified home inspector. This is a very important step in the home buying process. The home inspection consists of a very detailed look throughout the home. The main goal of a home inspection is to make sure that the home is safe to live in. For example, the inspector will take a close look at the roof to make sure it is well intact. They will also check to see if there is any structural or mechanical damage such as broken heating systems, or a collapsing floor. The basement will be checked for cracks and damage as well as your toilets and more. A termite report is usually needed as well, which you can have the home inspector do at the time of inspection to save you time and money. This isn’t required but it is generally cheaper compared to contracting a separate termite inspection agency.  It is very important to follow the inspector and take notes on what he is observing. Some issues may not arise now, but can turn into problems in the future, especially in older homes. It is important to be educated and prepared for possible future maintenance that you will need and how to avoid problems if possible.  An inspection is also another tool you can have in your back pocket for sale negotiation purposes. Damage that needs to be fixed on the home can be negotiated to have the seller pay for them or to even have the purchase price of the home lowered to compensate for the maintenance work needed.   Read the rest of this article from Buyhomeapp.com here


Find a Type and Location For Your Property

clock March 28, 2014 09:46 by author MyTitleDirect
The next step in the home buying process will be to find out where you want to live and what type of home you want to live in. A.    Choosing a location you want to live in is very important. Maybe you’ve always wanted to live by the beach, in the big city or a little closer to your retired parents. Most buyers have a general location where they want to buy a home. Try to narrow your search down to a few neighborhoods, like a specific zip code or county. Having an idea of where you want to live will give you the best chance of finding the home you want.   Read the rest of the article on BuyHomeApp.com


Angie's List Buyer beware: How to avoid a home closing nightmare

clock March 10, 2014 06:29 by author MyTitleDirect
  Buyer beware: How to avoid a home closing nightmare January 27, 2014 by Michael Schroeder   Property titles: Be involved in selection While no guarantees come with any home purchase, experts reiterate that hiring professional advocates who put buyers first from loan to title work remains the best bet for the smoothest close. “I’m the advocate for my clients, because I know this business inside and out,” says Tina Harrison, vice president of highly rated JDR Title in Tysons Corner, Va. “Buyers really need to have … somebody looking out for them.” For title work, Harrison suggests getting quotes in writing. Lenders or real estate agents may provide lists of title companies, she says, but because affiliations sometimes exist between these parties, further evaluate these options before deciding to hire. “The influence and pressure of profits can cause a company to miss the mark on advocating for the buyer,” she says, noting JDR is an independent title company. That could play out in a lender that tells the title company to gloss over terms a buyer may be uncomfortable with — such as an interest rate that ticked up, or a pre-payment penalty — and pressure the buyer to sign. “There are behind-the-curtain incentives … literally some lenders who own their own title companies tell their employees that you have to refer to our title company,” she says. To evaluate title company options, ask if any affiliations exist when you receive a recommendation. Inquire, too, about licensure, required for title agents in all states, a full list of charges, and the title company’s hours. Tapan Desai, a member in Leesburg, Va., used a loan officer at a California-based mortgage company that he declined to name, since it still holds his loan, who “was terrible to put it kindly,” he says. “We were 10 days overdue on the closing date and the seller of the house had decided that he was going to start accepting new offers.” Fortunately, Desai says, JDR swooped in to help seal the deal. “They even sent a closing agent to our home at 10 p.m. with the finalized paperwork to sign,” he says, on a Friday before the Monday he closed. Desai says he paid JDR about $1,000 for title work and his growing family moved from a 760-square-foot condo to a 3,800-square-foot suburban home with five bedrooms and a basement for about $500,000. “They understand home buying is a very emotional process and they work very, very closely with you,” he says.  “They just went above and beyond in all aspects to make sure we could secure the home we wanted. . . . Member Brenda Payne expected to spend this Christmas hosting out-of-town family in her new home, a brick five-bedroom, renovated ranch located in an established neighborhood in Cheyenne, Wyo. “We thought it had pretty much everything we were looking for,” she says of the $370,000 house with three fireplaces where she and her husband plan to retire. “We were very excited.” Instead, after moving in briefly, Payne says she’s had to move back out and hire contractors to do an estimated $90,000 worth of repairs from fixing the roof to addressing structural issues. She says they’re tearing out drywall that covered mold in the basement, fixing a master bedroom fireplace that didn’t vent properly, and replacing improperly installed bathroom tile in addition to other repair and remodeling work. “It was like a Pandora’s box … I spent a few days crying I was so distraught and upset,” Payne says. “We’re looking at currently [moving in] January or February because the extent of everything that has to be done.” The purchase of a home should be a joyous occasion. But closing on a home can prove a stressful experience, too, as would-be buyers scramble to provide voluminous documentation to secure financing, quickly uncover imperfections  that could prove costly later, and review and negotiate terms — all before inking a deal. Senior writer Jason Michael White contributed to this story. [Source:  Angieslist.com. Read the complete article on their site here:  https://www.angieslist.com/articles/buyer-beware-how-avoid-home-closing- nightmare.htm] Click Here for PDF version of article: Buyer beware angieslist 1 title.pdf (115.98 kb)