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The Contract of Sale

clock July 17, 2014 09:09 by author MyTitleDirect
  Now that your ideal property has passed inspection, it’s time to enter into a contract of sale with the seller. A contract of sale in a real estate transaction is a legal contract documenting the promise to exchange a property from seller to buyer for an agreed upon value of money. The contract is usually prepared between the buyer’s and seller’s attorneys and outlines the following:  Who the buyer and sellers are and the mentions of subject property What price was agreed on, how much of it is the buyer paying upfront, and how much is being financed Contingencies such as a mortgage commitment from the lender and repairs to be made by the seller. There is usually a stated time frame for such contingencies.  List of personal moveable items agreed on by buyer and seller, e.g. Shed, pool, etc… An occupancy/possession agreement outlining when the buyer will obtain possession of the home and when seller will vacate the property When the closing date will be  


Setting A Closing Date: the How's & Why's

clock April 21, 2014 05:57 by author MyTitleDirect
Now that the title search is complete and you have your mortgage commitment signed, you are ready to set a closing date. When setting a closing date, there are a few things to keep in mind. First off, most people decide to close at the end of the month. The reason behind this desire is due to the fact that there is prepaid interest due at closing. This means that at closing, you are required to pay the interest for the month you are closing. The prepaid interest is calculated from the date you close until the end of that month. For example, if you close on the March 14th, you will pay interest from that date until March 31st. If you close on March 30th, you will pay interest until March 31st, or only one day’s worth of interest. Closing towards the end of the month will require less prepaid interest to be brought to the closing table. It is also important to understand that your 1st mortgage payment will not be due until the 1st full month after you closing is complete. This means that is you close on March 14th, your 1st mortgage payment will not be due until May 1st. Coordinating the date of your closing will take some planning. There are a few items to factor in.  First, you want to make sure all parties can attend. Parties in a home purchase will include:  the buyer’s attorney, the buyers, the seller’s attorney, the sellers, the bank’s attorney and the title company. All of these people will need to agree on a date, time and location. You also want to make sure to bring any necessary items. For instance, a necessary item could be a satisfaction of a judgment that which showed up on the title exam. Your attorney will let you know what these items will be, if any. You will also need a valid ID, such as your driver’s license or passport. Additionally, you may be asked to bring proof that your property taxes are paid (seller). Bank checks will also be needed for certain payments. You will be advised prior to closing on all of these conditions. Read the rest of the article on Buyhomeapp.com here


Home Inspection Report: The When and Why

clock April 9, 2014 10:27 by author MyTitleDirect
Once your offer has been accepted, but before you sign your Contract of Sale, it is very important to get your home Inspected by a qualified home inspector. This is a very important step in the home buying process. The home inspection consists of a very detailed look throughout the home. The main goal of a home inspection is to make sure that the home is safe to live in. For example, the inspector will take a close look at the roof to make sure it is well intact. They will also check to see if there is any structural or mechanical damage such as broken heating systems, or a collapsing floor. The basement will be checked for cracks and damage as well as your toilets and more. A termite report is usually needed as well, which you can have the home inspector do at the time of inspection to save you time and money. This isn’t required but it is generally cheaper compared to contracting a separate termite inspection agency.  It is very important to follow the inspector and take notes on what he is observing. Some issues may not arise now, but can turn into problems in the future, especially in older homes. It is important to be educated and prepared for possible future maintenance that you will need and how to avoid problems if possible.  An inspection is also another tool you can have in your back pocket for sale negotiation purposes. Damage that needs to be fixed on the home can be negotiated to have the seller pay for them or to even have the purchase price of the home lowered to compensate for the maintenance work needed.   Read the rest of this article from Buyhomeapp.com here


Title Insurance for Less? A new breed of insurance company is promising discounts for home buyers ~ W.S.J.

clock April 1, 2014 08:28 by author MyTitleDirect
A new breed of insurance company is promising discounts on a type of policy many home buyers don't even realize they need: title insurance. Almost everyone who buys a house also purchases title insurance. Mortgage lenders generally require that borrowers buy a so-called lender's policy. Owners can buy a separate policy for themselves. The insurers determine if there is clear ownership of the property and offer protection if someone later claims an ownership interest in it.   Brian DeYoung   Title insurance can cost hundreds of dollars for modest houses and thousands for multimillion-dollar properties. Yet many home buyers don't focus on the product, or the price, until they sit down at the closing. There often is little incentive to shop around, as established insurers typically charge similar premiums and some states set or cap prices. Consumers tend to rely on a mortgage broker, real-estate agent or lawyer to connect them with a title insurer. Now upstart insurers and agencies are challenging the status quo. Insurance agencies also are being more aggressive in competing for title-insurance business. Redfin, a real-estate agency based in Seattle that has pioneered the use of technology in real-estate sales, started a title-insurance agency, Title Forward, in early 2013. It is based in Philadelphia and sells policies in Maryland, Virginia, Pennsylvania, Georgia and the District of Columbia. Title Forward is telling customers it can save them money by helping them figure out which type of title-insurance policy they need—and whether they can do without the more-expensive "enhanced" policies many agents sell. These policies can cover home buyers if the seller doesn't pay a contractor who did work on the house just before the sale and later claims he is owed money, according to Adam Wiener, a Redfin executive. Enhanced policies cost as much as 17% more in the states where Title Forward works, he says. Title Forward's policies are issued by industry giant First American Financial. Sue-Ann Greenfield, an entertainment-industry business manager from Manhattan, was buying a second home in exclusive Sag Harbor, N.Y., last fall when she went onto the Internet to research closing costs. "I decided I was going to be proactive," she says. "Why am I spending all this money on title insurance, and I don't even know what it is?" Still, greater competition will benefit consumers, says Birny Birnbaum, executive director of the Center for Economic Justice, a nonprofit consumer-advocacy organization based in Texas. Mr. Birnbaum notes that state insurance departments have "requirements in place to make sure a company can pay its claims." In 2007, the U.S. Government Accountability Office, Congress's investigative arm, concluded that the title-insurance industry's reliance on agents who sell to real-estate and mortgage professionals and lawyers, rather than to consumers, presents potential conflicts of interest and raises questions about the "reasonableness of prices" paid by consumers. [The Wall Street Journal]   Read the entire Wall Street Journal article by Leslie Scism (email at leslie.scism@wsj.com) and Alan Zibel (email at alan.zibel@wsj.com) on their web site here  


Learn About The Home Buying Process From Buyhomeapp.com

clock March 12, 2014 10:37 by author MyTitleDirect
Buying a home is a very exciting time. You are looking to purchase a place where you and your family will host countless birthday parties, Thanksgiving dinners, and game nights. Since buying a house is one of the biggest decisions you will make in your lifetime, we are here to help guide you through the process.  Listed below is an outline of the steps you will go through to buy your home: 1) Prepare Yourself 2) Find a type and location of your property 3) Get Prequalified for your mortgage 4) Find your dream home 5) Find an Attorney 6) Get a Home Inspection Report 7) Sign the Contract of Sale 8) Mortgage Application Procees from Start to Finish (Application to signed commitment) 9) Get a title search completed and cleared 10) Set a Closing Date: The How’s and Why’s 11) What Happens After the Closing: Start Packing and Planning the Move Read the rest of the article and learn about the process at BuyHomeApp.com